Archive for the ‘A Seattle Wedding and Portrait Blog’ Category

Protected: The Chapters of the Wedding Day Photo Essay by Natalie Fobes

Friday, May 20th, 2011

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Protected: Retouching tips by Natalie Fobes

Friday, May 20th, 2011

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Album samples from prior years

Friday, May 20th, 2011

Protected: Model Shots

Friday, May 20th, 2011

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Protected: CODB calculators and Package calculators by Natalie Fobes

Friday, May 6th, 2011

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Fobes Profile in Huffington Post

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Check out the profile on my work in the April 15th Huffington Post. You can find it at  http://tinyurl.com/fobes-huffingtonpost

Steven Crandell did a wonderful job and had many insights into my work/life.

Photo lectures and print judging

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011

Just got back from a great, but short, trip to LA and Las Vegas. I gave a presentation on documentary photography at the Annenberg Space for Photography. The space was wonderful and the crowd enthusiastic. Lynda, Bruce, David and Ben of www.lynda.com were there.

The next day I went to Las Vegas to give a presentation titled “The A-Z of documentary projects” and judge the photojournalism categories of the print competition. The experience of the  people at my talk ranged from just a few months to over 42 years. They were incredible and had lots of great questions.

I was in awe of many of the fantastic images I judged at the competition. Susan Stripling continues to do sweet work. A desaturated and vintage printing style is one of the trends right now. It adds a timeless quality to the photographs. Long narrow crops were also striking. Most winners were printed smaller than the 16×20 board and matted. Some were so small the judges had to get up to see the detail. In my mind, this doesn’t help the image. Make it big enough to see.

Another tip, especially for the photojournalism categories, GIVE THE PRINT A TITLE!  Too many compelling but confusing photographs were untitled. These are categories where the story is often as important as the imagery.

I was pleased to learn that one of my  portraits was honored in the Senior Portraits category. Riley is in his first year of a full-ride scholarship at Juilliard. I processed the file by pulling back the saturation, adding warmth and then creating a mask to bring back color in the grass.

So you’ve graduated, now it is time to start saving

Wednesday, June 16th, 2010

I remember when I graduated from school. I was tapped out financially. Each week’s paycheck meant that I could slowly add to my household goods. A sleeping bag on the floor was my bed,  stacked newspapers were my chairs, extra plastic forks from KFC were my cutlery and when it came time to buy gas, I scrounged on the floor of my 1972 super beetle for small change.

Times were tight, no question about it. But I realized even then that I had to start saving a small portion of my paycheck for emergencies. It started out as just $10 or $20 a week. My first big purchase was an antique Hoosier Kitchen Cabinet. My next was a mattress. Eventually I had furniture, plates and silverware.

I raised the amount earmarked for my savings.

When my VW’s engine needed to be rebuilt I paid for it with my savings. Two years after graduation when I grew tired of unreasonable landlords I bought a house.

I didn’t have a credit card until I was 27.

It isn’t only smart that you save for the unexpected, it is absolutely imperative that you save.

Saw this interesting article in the Seattle Times this weekend that I thought you’d enjoy.

Congratulations to the class of 2010! I can’t wait to see what you do next!

Trek Bhutan with Natalie

Tuesday, May 4th, 2010

I’m leading a tour to Bhutan this Fall and am so excited. We will be there for almost two weeks. The trip is timed so that we will be able to photograph the harvest and the celebrations.

For more info check out Bhutan 2010.

New York Times article on photography

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

Interesting, and depressing, article on the future of photography in the NYT. If you are an amateur, and don’t have to make a living, you’ll do okay. If you are a pro, good luck.

Too many clients are willing to settle for “good enough.”

My question, what are you going to do to convince them that excellent photography is the way to go?